Debbie Remaley

Debbie Remaley

Debbie Remaley has not set their biography yet

Posted on
Feeding Birds in Winter In our area of the Mid-Atlantic, many species of birds fly south in fall as the days shorten and their food sources becomes scarce. However, other species such as cardinals, woodpeckers, blue jays, and goldfinches will stay around through the winter and will be eager to visit feeders where they find a steady supply of food. Even though we haven’t had a particularly harsh winter so far, this is the time of year when food starts to dwindle for our non-migratory, backyard birds.

Many of them rely on the spent seed-heads of perennials or berries left over from fall, but it doesn’t take too long before those food sources begin to dwindle. And as the temperatures begin to drop in January and February, birds will need high-energy, high-protein foods to maintain their body temperatures. That means birds need food the most when it is least available in the wild. That’s where you come in!

Offer a feeding station that consists of a birdfeeder filled with one of our quality seed mixes. Choose a blend that is specially formulated to attract a variety of birds. Ingredients should include bird favorites like black oil sunflower, thistle and peanuts, which are attractive to a wide range of birds including cardinals, chickadees, finches, native sparrows and others. K&B True Value carries a variety of feeders specific to the type of seed blend and bird species that you are feeding. Common types include covered or open platforms for any size seed blend, cylinders or tubes for small seeds, and a hopper or "house" style to hold larger seeds like sunflower.

In addition to seed, consider offering suet as well. Birds use a lot of energy in the winter to stay warm and search for food, and suet is the high-energy snack that can help keep them going through the tough times. Rich in valuable calories because it's primarily made of fat, suet attracts woodpeckers, chickadees and many other species. We carry wire-cage feeders designed specifically for suet. The birds will cling to the wire and peck at the food through the gaps.

You’ll become a hub of the bird community once you acquire the reputation for fine dining. Make sure to stay on top of keeping the feeders filled, especially when it is particularly cold or snowy. And if you haven’t yet, join our K&B True Value Birding Club! Just buy ten bags of birdseed and get one bag free! You save and the birds eat. Win-win.

Posted on
Toilets

“Did you ever go to a party, go in the bathroom, flush the toilet, and the water starts coming up? That is the most frightening moment in the life of a human being.” -Jerry Seinfeld

Posted on
Cool Weather Vegetables

The last couple months of summer were blazingly hot this year. Coupled with the heavy rains in June and July, your vegetable garden probably struggled with higher incidences of fungus, mildew, and pests this year. So if your cukes and tomatoes didn’t do particularly well this season...join the club. But, the good news is that you have another few months of vegetable gardening left with cool-weather vegetables!

Posted on

Want to see birds without ever having to leave home? Look no further than outside your own window. All you need to attract birds is the right type of bird feeder and food. And don't be concerned about creating a hardship for birds should you decide to take a hiatus from bird feeding. Backyard bird feeders account for a relatively small percent of a bird's overall food supply, which is why when traditional food is available (i.e., worms, insects, seeds, berries, etc), birds will often opt for that instead.

Posted on
Canning

How is your vegetable garden looking right now? It should be at the peak of production at this point, overflowing with summer bounty. And this is where most people discover the gardener’s dilemma ... too much of a good thing. Sure, planting all those zucchini plants seemed like a brilliant idea back in May, but now? You have so many zucchini that you may have to sell your house. But don’t fret. We have a solution. Canning.

Posted on
LED's

Remember when you could stroll down the lighting aisle when you needed a bulb and grab a couple of sixty-watts without even thinking about it? Those were the days! But times have changed. How many times over the past couple of years have you found yourself in that same aisle, scratching your head, puzzling over the myriad of confusing selections that are now available? It’s confusing. We know.

Posted on
Zika Virus Products

Zika virus disease (Zika) is a disease caused by the Zika virus, which is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after being bitten by an infected mosquito. People usually don’t get sick enough to go to the hospital, and they very rarely die of Zika. For this reason, many people might not realize they have been infected. However, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly, as well as other severe fetal brain defects. Once a person has been infected, he or she is likely to be protected from future infections.

Posted on
Green Gardening this Spring

Simple, earth ­friendly practices will beautify your yard — naturally

Posted on
Starting From Seed

Starting Seedlings in Winter

Posted on
Ice Melters 101

MYTH: If I throw ice melter on the driveway, the ice will always go away.

When it comes to Christmas Lights, LED or Incandecent?

It’s about time to start digging out those boxes of Christmas lights out from the basement or attic and begin the process of untangling years worth of knots. If your strands are starting to get stiff or, conversely, the braids are starting to unravel, it’s time to think about new lights. Odds are that most of your older lights are electricity-guzzling incandescents, so it’s time to make the switch to LEDs.

Posted on
Your Home and Autumn's Arrival- Part 2

Autumn is here and its getting colder- fast.

Posted on
Fall Lawn Care


Fall is right around the corner, which means it is time to start to thinking about your lawn. To ensure a healthy turf come spring, fall lawn care is critical and needs to begin now!

Posted on
Hot Weather Watering

Let’s talk Maryland weather. The last two years notwithstanding, our winters tend to be fairly mild. That’s the upside. On the downside, our summers are brutally hot and humid with a great deal of rain from mid-May to late June. The grass is green as green can be, and gardens thrive. But then, the waterworks stop. From July through mid-September, Maryland enters a dry season. And that’s when things get dicey.

Posted on
Catch, Steam & Enjoy!

Maryland crab season starts in early spring which is fine if you like small, anemic crabs who have just groggily crawled out of the muck from their long winter snooze. Long-time residents know July is when the crabs start to get good and heavy. However, unless you’re not willing to fork out a substantial chunk of change for a bushel of crabs, you should consider catching them yourself. It’s easier than you think.

The Doctor is In… the Plant Doctor That Is

We’ve had a lot of rain lately, which is unusual for Maryland this time of year. Usually we’d be experiencing Maryland’s annual summer drought and we would be giving you watering tips. But not this year. That is both good and bad. It’s good in that you are not lugging hoses all over the yard in the sweltering heat. But all the moisture, coupled with humidity and heat, can introduce a host of diseases and pests into your garden.

Posted on
Grub Control

You work hard on your lawn. We appreciate that. Your family appreciates that. Your neighbors appreciate that. So, when brown spots appear, it’s upsetting. We totally get that. What’s the deal? Most likely grubs.

Posted on
Get Your Boat Ready for the Water

After a slow start, spring is finally here, and we are moving quickly towards boating season. That means it's time to get your boat cleaned up and ready for action!

Your Deck –Maintenance, Cleaning & Staining

Decks made of composite materials have gained in popularity in recent years because, although they cost more to build, they are low-maintenance and last a long time. However, many people still have a wood deck and/or prefer the look and feel of a classic wood deck--which does take a bit of work every year. Even if your deck is just a few years old, it's a good idea to start a routine now to increase its lifespan.

Prevent Weeds with Corn Gluten Timing is Critical!

Weeds love spring just like everyone else, and they arrive en masse in lawns. Once there, it's a monumental task to get rid of them. That's why you need to get ahead of them with Espoma Organic® Weed Preventer or Jonathan Green Organic Weed Control with Fertilizer!